The Thames Monster

Published by Thames Rockets 891 days ago

€˜Dur-du...    Dur-du...    Dur-du...'

You may have been following the flood of articles and re-shared camera phone footage that have been doing the rounds on a variety of news sites and social media platforms showing off one of London's newest residents. First captured on film on April 1st, the footage of the €˜Thames Monster' was dismissed as a hoax but then quickly verified - it was not faked!!! Monster 6 We were then approached by The Evening Standard to take them €˜Monster Hunting', needless to say the endeavor was for a light hearted treatment of the story. We have worked with a wide variety of people wanting to shoot footage on the Thames for all sorts of reasons, films, documentaries, serious news features and most recently for Sky One's €˜Dogs Might Fly'. Have a look at our mini-(MOCKU)-mentry here... We've had lots of fun on social media with people enjoying our €˜coverage' of the possibility of our own €˜Nessie' in London. And you, our lovely passengers on board have gotten into the spirit as well keeping your eyes peeled and cameras at the ready for a fin here or a tail there. It seems (much like politics) a week in Monster Hunting is a long time. We thought the story had all but run it is course by last Friday and was gently ebbing away on the spring tide. However there have been not one but two fresh sightings over the weekend! Again the footage is fairly inconclusive... Sea Monster 5 Our own Thames Rockets guides managed to capture this image over the weekend, showing the monster is making its way right into central London now! Sea Monster 4 All joking aside we think there are a few huge pluses to this story. We hope it's making people realise that there's now a huge variety of wildlife (that actually) is living in the Thames. In fact, besides the fish and bird life living in the river, more than 2,000 seals and some 450 porpoises and dolphins have been spotted in the Thames in the past decade, figures from the Zoological Society of London tell us. We hope it's making locals and visitors' alike stop, gaze upon, and consider the Thames and everything that goes on above and below the surface.